Why do people engage with conspiracy theories online?

This study by Morosoli et al was published a couple of months ago in Convergence: The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies. To answer the question in the title of this post, the researchers surveyed over 7000 people in 6 countries (Belgium, Switzerland, Germany, France, the UK and the U.S.) to check what… Read More Why do people engage with conspiracy theories online?

No, older adults seem not to be more likely to fall for fake news than younger adults

This is a study that got me surprised, to be honest. It found that older adults are no more likely to fall for fake news than younger adults, with age-related susceptibility to deceptive news evident only among those categorized as the ‘oldest old.’ A couple of elements to consider: the study was conducted during the… Read More No, older adults seem not to be more likely to fall for fake news than younger adults

Interesting new study: The Limits of Sharenting

Michiel Walrave and colleagues published an interesting qualitative study in Frontiers on sharenting: Exploring Parents’ and Adolescents’ Sharenting Boundaries Through the Lens of Communication Privacy Management Theory (CPM):  Specifically, CPM recognizes three general principles (i.e., “privacy ownership,” “privacy rules,” and “privacy turbulence”) to clarify the privacy-related choices individuals make when managing the disclosure of information… Read More Interesting new study: The Limits of Sharenting

BPS Podcast: Why do people share false information?

I do hope that I’m not sharing false information, but I’m pretty sure I’m not: In this episode 29 of PsychCrunch, the podcast from the British Psychological Society’s Research Digest our presenters Ginny Smith and Jon Sutton explore the psychology of misinformation. They hear about the factors that make people more or less likely to share misinformation,… Read More BPS Podcast: Why do people share false information?

People with depressive symptoms are more likely to believe false statements about COVID-19 vaccines

Some people think we are living in a time of misinformation, although they could be misinformed. Still, this study shows that adults with depressive symptoms were twice as likely to support misinformation about COVID-19 vaccines. Less surprising: people who endorsed false statements were half as likely to be vaccinated against COVID-19. And yes, these are… Read More People with depressive symptoms are more likely to believe false statements about COVID-19 vaccines

Interesting preprint: Social Media Use and Well-Being: What we Know and What We Need to Know

Sometimes it’s a bit of a strange situation that you find a new piece of research by someone you know through someone you know. I found this umbrella review by Patti Valkenburg via Dan Willingham. It’s a small world indeed. What is this preprint about? Research into the impact of social media use (SMU) on… Read More Interesting preprint: Social Media Use and Well-Being: What we Know and What We Need to Know