When False Claims Are Repeated, We Start To Believe They Are True — Here’s How Behaving Like A Fact-Checker Can Help

Originally posted on Research Digest:
By Matthew Warren If you hear an unfounded statement often enough, you might just start believing that it’s true. This phenomenon, known as the “illusory truth effect”, is exploited by politicians and advertisers — and if you think you are immune to it, you’re probably wrong. In fact, earlier this year…

“Politically Incorrect” Speakers Are Seen As More Authentic — Especially If The Audience Already Shares Their Views

Originally posted on Research Digest:
By Emma Young “I think the big problem this country has is being politically correct.” So said then-candidate Donald J Trump during a US presidential debate in 2015. Trump may have strong feelings on the matter, but he’s not alone. “Dozens of articles are written about political correctness every month in…

A new study on the Flynn Effect in the US shows something quite different

We have discussed the Flynn Effect – the rise of IQ over decades – over and over again on this blog. We’ve also seen that there is possibly a reverse Flynn Effect in several countries lately. A new study makes this even more complicated:   When outdated norms are used, the Flynn Effect inflates IQs… Read More A new study on the Flynn Effect in the US shows something quite different

The difference between learning and thinking you have learned

Several colleagues shared this study past weekend, and I can understand why: Despite active learning being recognized as a superior method of instruction in the classroom, a major recent survey found that most college STEM instructors still choose traditional teaching methods. This article addresses the long-standing question of why students and faculty remain resistant to… Read More The difference between learning and thinking you have learned