Interesting: Mating patterns could actually help explain many supposedly biological relationships between traits

This study is maybe less practical, but this doesn’t make it less interesting, as it states that genetic correlation estimates typically assume that mating is random. But is that really the case? In the real world, partners tend to pair up because of many shared interests and social structures. From the press release: Through the… Read More Interesting: Mating patterns could actually help explain many supposedly biological relationships between traits

Check this podcast about why a lot of children can’t read: Sold a Story

This is a must-hear podcast about learning how to read – or better how not to learn how to read. There’s an idea about how children learn to read that’s held sway in schools for more than a generation — even though it was proven wrong by cognitive scientists decades ago. Teaching methods based on… Read More Check this podcast about why a lot of children can’t read: Sold a Story

How poor children are often hurt twice by teacher shortages

Primary schools with vulnerable children are hit harder by the teacher shortage, according to an analysis of Flemish school data by Kristof De Witte and KU Leuven colleagues. This will surprise only a few people, as we’ve seen this to be the case in many countries and regions. Such schools are more common in an… Read More How poor children are often hurt twice by teacher shortages

New review published: How Diverse Is Diversity? An Exploration of References to Diversity in the Recent Literature in STEM Higher Education

Yesterday my old team from Leiden received a new publication related to the work we have been doing on tutoring and STEM. One of the side projects was examining how diversity is being studied in research on STEM. Lead author is Amber Bruijnzeel and the whole team participated. The reference: Bruijnzeel, A., Yazilitas, D., Smeets,… Read More New review published: How Diverse Is Diversity? An Exploration of References to Diversity in the Recent Literature in STEM Higher Education

The power of music: singing to infants synchronizes caregiver-infant social engagement

Singing for infants is something that is truly universal. This new study shows that engaging infants with a song provides a ready-made means for supporting social development and interaction: Singing to infants is observed in all human cultures. Beyond known roles in infant soothing and social bonding, this study shows that singing to infants elicits… Read More The power of music: singing to infants synchronizes caregiver-infant social engagement

Discipulus Economicus: The Calculating Learner

Originally posted on 3-Star learning experiences:
Paul A. Kirschner This blog has been previously posted on https://www.kirschnered.nl/2022/11/09/discipulus-economicus-the-calculating-learner/ Maybe you’ve heard of the homo economicus (Latin for economic man). Wikipedia defines the homo economicus as “the portrayal of humans as agents who are consistently rational and narrowly self-interested, and who pursue their subjectively defined ends optimally.” In normal language: The…

Another gap that starts earlier than you might think: extracurricular activities in kindergarten

I don’t like the idea of a ‘gap’ between people, as Hans Rösling explained that it suggests that there are two groups with nobody between them while the majority can be found between the two suggested groups. That’s why I prefer talking about unfair differences. And this study shows another example of how inequality can… Read More Another gap that starts earlier than you might think: extracurricular activities in kindergarten