An interesting use of artificial intelligence in education: to catch the cheats

Lately I have been involved in different discussions about Artificial Intelligence in education behind the screens. To paraphrase Larry Cuban: the claims made about AI are often oversold, with simple algorithms without any element of machine learning being labeled AI. E.g. together with some other scientists I’m still waiting for any solid evidence of a… Read More An interesting use of artificial intelligence in education: to catch the cheats

Again: possible effects of early-life challenges

Some of these insights are maybe not new but worth repeating: experiences such as poverty, residential instability, or parental divorce or substance abuse, can affect executive function and lead to changes in a child’s brain chemistry, muting the effects of stress hormones. From the press release: Adversity early in life tends to affect a child’s… Read More Again: possible effects of early-life challenges

Do expert teachers look at their class differently? (Best Evidence in Brief)

There are often huge differences between experts and novices. This is also the case for teachers.  Best Evidence in Brief discusses a new study on one of those possible differences. Teachers’ gaze patterns could reveal the different priorities expert teachers and novice teachers might have in their classrooms, according to a recent study published in Learning… Read More Do expert teachers look at their class differently? (Best Evidence in Brief)