Not really new, but confirmation can be handy: new study shows quizzes improve academic performance

We’ve known the positive effect on learning of regular (low-stake) testing for quite some while, but this meta-analytic study in combination reconfirms it. From the press release: About a year ago, a conversation during a faculty meeting piqued Marcus Crede’s interest. A senior faculty member in Iowa State University’s Department of Psychology said that he… Read More Not really new, but confirmation can be handy: new study shows quizzes improve academic performance

New meta-analysis on the bilingual advantage in executive functions of children

This is quite a study by Gunnured et al. It checks a lot of quality boxes, such as preregistration, open data… The topic is a field that has been quite difficult to examine, as it discusses the influence of bilingualism on executive functions (EF) of children. Why is this kind of research difficult? Well, while… Read More New meta-analysis on the bilingual advantage in executive functions of children

The Cost-Benefit Case for Tutoring (Best Evidence in Brief)

There is a new Best Evidence in Brief and among the interesting new studies and reviews, Claire Chuter writes about a new meta-analysis about tutoring, something I’m also doing research on in Leiden (bold by me): Individual preK-12 tutoring experiments, varying widely in context, approach, and cost, have shown the positive impact of tutoring and small-group… Read More The Cost-Benefit Case for Tutoring (Best Evidence in Brief)

Does the smartphone hinder learning? New review study suggests ‘yes’, but…

A new review study by Amez and Baert examined the existing research on the use of smartphones and the consequences for academic success. In short: A predominance of empirical results supporting a negative association. This finding is driven by studies relying on actual GPA measures. But, there is one important limitation: The literature’s main limitation… Read More Does the smartphone hinder learning? New review study suggests ‘yes’, but…