What Works for Students with Mathematics Difficulties in K-12? (Best Evidence in Brief)

There is a new Best Evidence in Brief and this time I picked this study from this biweekly newsletter written up by Marta Pellegrini: A recent meta-analysis evaluated the effectiveness of interventions for elementary students with math difficulties. To be included in the review, studies had to use randomized or quasi-experimental designs and evaluate word-problem solving… Read More What Works for Students with Mathematics Difficulties in K-12? (Best Evidence in Brief)

No, older adults seem not to be more likely to fall for fake news than younger adults

This is a study that got me surprised, to be honest. It found that older adults are no more likely to fall for fake news than younger adults, with age-related susceptibility to deceptive news evident only among those categorized as the ‘oldest old.’ A couple of elements to consider: the study was conducted during the… Read More No, older adults seem not to be more likely to fall for fake news than younger adults

New meta-analysis on the effects of Augmented Reality in education (Best Evidence in Brief)

There is a new Best Evidence in Brief and this time I picked this study from this biweekly newsletter written up by Elaine Lau: Augmented Reality (AR) is a technological advancement of the modern era that allows users to enjoy virtual experiences through their senses. AR has been adopted in education to enable students to visualize and… Read More New meta-analysis on the effects of Augmented Reality in education (Best Evidence in Brief)

The effects of lockdowns on young people can go both ways: two seemingly contradicting studies

The bottom line of most studies I’ve seen on the effects of the pandemic is that the existing differences between people have become bigger. That’s also how you can explain two seemingly different results in two new studies. On the one hand, we have this UK study by company STEER Education summarized in TES: Girls… Read More The effects of lockdowns on young people can go both ways: two seemingly contradicting studies

Why educational research often doesn’t find it’s way into the classroom

Yesterday Carl Hendrick shared this image, taken from this article by Michelle Chi: I would add one more to this list: Researchers often think or seem to think that teachers don’t know what they’re doing. A mistake one can make when introducing e.g. spaced repetition. A lot of teachers know this from experience, but that… Read More Why educational research often doesn’t find it’s way into the classroom

Meta-review states: Retrieval Practice Consistently Benefits Student Learning

Retrieval practice has been all the rage for some time now, although someone mentioned to me earlier this week that his mother used to do it as a teacher long for he or she heard about ‘retrieval practice’. Now a meta-review by Agarwal, Nunes and Blunt shows, based on 49 effect sizes that it benefits all… Read More Meta-review states: Retrieval Practice Consistently Benefits Student Learning

Why is the application of neuroscience in education lacking progress?

Jelle and Dietsje Jolles published a review in Frontiers in Psychology on the question mentioned in this title.  They see 3 reasons: 1… “research in the past fifteen years has placed the emphasis on the results of experiments in which brain imaging methods (notably Magnetic Resonance Imaging, MRI) have been used. In retrospect, the neuroimaging… Read More Why is the application of neuroscience in education lacking progress?