Mitos urbanos sobre aprendizaje y educación (Our first Urban Myths about Learning and Education now available in Spanish)

No, I will never get used to this. We first wrote our book in Dutch. This was followed by the extremely popular version in English (with still at least one copy sold every single day, imagine that), a version in Swedish and even a Chinese edition. And now the Spanish version has been published. Muchas… Read More Mitos urbanos sobre aprendizaje y educación (Our first Urban Myths about Learning and Education now available in Spanish)

Children of well-educated mothers and fathers have higher survival rates

We’ve known for a long time that there is a correlation between the educational level of mothers and surviving as a child. But this new review study published in The Lancet shows also the importance of fathers’ education even in rich countries! From the press release: Every day, around 15 000 children under the age of… Read More Children of well-educated mothers and fathers have higher survival rates

This is really, really bad: papers that cannot be replicated are cited 153 times more because their findings are interesting

Maybe this study has to be replicated first, but if true it’s really a sad thing: papers that cannot be replicated are cited 153 times more because their findings are interesting. From the press release: Papers in leading psychology, economic and science journals that fail to replicate and therefore are less likely to be true… Read More This is really, really bad: papers that cannot be replicated are cited 153 times more because their findings are interesting

New review discusses the complex reciprocal relation between learning and motivation

We’ve known for a long time now that it’s not as simple as stating that motivation will lead to learning or vice versa. TuongVan Vu and colleagues try to clarify this better in a new review paper (h/t Greg Ashman for pointing me to this paper). The researchers introduce a nice circular diagram summarising the… Read More New review discusses the complex reciprocal relation between learning and motivation

How to Write Research Articles that Readers Understand and Cite: 3 ways to improve in a new article (but I know you can guess them)

People have massively shared my second Funny on Sunday Post. One reply I received was quite telling: this never could be real papers as the titles are so to the point. This brings me to a new paper I’ve read… From the press release: Researchers from University of Arizona and University of Utah published a… Read More How to Write Research Articles that Readers Understand and Cite: 3 ways to improve in a new article (but I know you can guess them)

This is such a nice farewell to Robert Slavin in his ‘Best Evidence in Brief’

On Saturday Robert Slavin passed away. This is sad news for everybody who knew him and for educational research. There is a very beautiful farewell in the latest Best Evidence in Brief, the newsletter that Robert Slavin started. Besides the touching eulogy, the first study that is being discussed is the following: How effective is… Read More This is such a nice farewell to Robert Slavin in his ‘Best Evidence in Brief’

School-based interventions can help improve reading and math in at-risk children

There is a new systematic review study on a topic that is highly relevant to the present situation. High‐quality evidence shows that, on average, school‐based interventions aimed at students who are experiencing, or at risk of, academic difficulties, do improve reading and mathematics outcomes in the short term. This is in line with a previous… Read More School-based interventions can help improve reading and math in at-risk children