New Swedish report on 1 laptop per child: no benefits for learning, possible negative effect on equality

Sara Hjelm pointed me to this new, Swedish report on giving every child a laptop in education. The conclusion is pretty clear: On average, we find no significant impact of 1:1 programs on student performance, as measured by their results on national standardized tests in mathematics and language at the end of lower secondary school.… Read More New Swedish report on 1 laptop per child: no benefits for learning, possible negative effect on equality

Maybe it’s a good/bad idea to watch these two documentaries in a row (about Tech and Education)

The past week my wife and I watched both The Inventor and the Netflix documentary about the Fyre Festival. This was both a great idea and a bad one. First the trailers, so you know what I’m talking about. The Inventor tells the true story behind the ‘Edison’, Theranos the company who made this machine… Read More Maybe it’s a good/bad idea to watch these two documentaries in a row (about Tech and Education)

Disappointing results for digital feedback in primary math (Best Evidence in Brief)

There is a new Best Evidence in Brief  and this time everything seems to be relevant, but I chose this new evaluation: The Education Endowment Foundation in the UK has published an evaluation of Digital Feedback in Primary Maths, a program that aims to improve primary school teachers’ feedback to students. The intervention uses a tablet… Read More Disappointing results for digital feedback in primary math (Best Evidence in Brief)

Maybe it’s not the smartphone: study of 400 teens finds little evidence linking excessive smartphone use and mental health outcomes

It’s an often repeated claim, but it seems hard to proof: our smartphones seem not to be the reason some of our children feel worse. From the press release: A new study, published in the journal Clinical Psychological Science, suggests that the time adolescents are spending on their phones and online is not that bad.… Read More Maybe it’s not the smartphone: study of 400 teens finds little evidence linking excessive smartphone use and mental health outcomes