Does the smartphone hinder learning? New review study suggests ‘yes’, but…

A new review study by Amez and Baert examined the existing research on the use of smartphones and the consequences for academic success. In short: A predominance of empirical results supporting a negative association. This finding is driven by studies relying on actual GPA measures. But, there is one important limitation: The literature’s main limitation… Read More Does the smartphone hinder learning? New review study suggests ‘yes’, but…

Again: silver bullets are seldom the case in education. E.g. no single solution helps all students complete MOOCs

Yesterday I received this very interesting Freakonomics podcast on the issue of the scalability of interventions. Often we see – also in education – that something works in an experiment or in a field trial, but when everybody starts adopting the new method or the new insight… it fails. There can be several reasons why,… Read More Again: silver bullets are seldom the case in education. E.g. no single solution helps all students complete MOOCs

Great new handy tool for students and researchers: connected papers

Yesterday I discovered this great new tool that I’m sure I will be using a lot myself and will advise my students to try when working on their papers: connected papers. An important element of scientific work is to build upon earlier insights or to nuance or contradict earlier findings in science. That’s why scientific… Read More Great new handy tool for students and researchers: connected papers

Virtual charter schools’ consistent and persistent negative impacts (Best Evidence in Brief)

There is a new Best Evidence in Brief and I’ve picked a very relevant but depressing study this time… As COVID pushes more schools online, the call for evidence of online learning is at a premium. Virtual charter schools are one recent innovation claiming to utilize technology for more individualized and flexible learning. However, a recent article published… Read More Virtual charter schools’ consistent and persistent negative impacts (Best Evidence in Brief)

Aptitude for learning languages is a stronger predictor of learning to program than basic math

I received this study through my wife as she suggested that I probably would be interested. She does know me well. This new study from the University of Washington suggests that a natural aptitude for learning languages is a stronger predictor of learning to program than basic math knowledge. Do note: a stronger predictor doesn’t… Read More Aptitude for learning languages is a stronger predictor of learning to program than basic math