Handy: checklist of common misconceptions about evolution in both popular media and school textbooks

Via @dylanwilliam I found this useful checklist of common misconceptions about evolution in both popular media and school textbooks. You can read and download the paper here. This is the kind of paper that should be written and shared more often giving teachers a fast update from science on their topic.

Abstract of the paper:

Topics related to evolution tend to generate a disproportionate amount of misunderstanding in traditional textbooks, other educational materials, and the media. This is not necessarily the fault of textbook and popular writers: many of these concepts are confusingly discussed in the scientific literature. However, faults can be corrected, and doing so makes it easier to explain related concepts. Three general areas are treated here: ideas and language about evolution, historical and philosophical aspects of evolution, and natural selection and related concepts. The aim of this paper is to produce a template for a more logical, historically and scientifically correct treatment of evolutionary terms and concepts
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1 Comment

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One response to “Handy: checklist of common misconceptions about evolution in both popular media and school textbooks

  1. Reblogged this on Evolution, Culture and Meaning and commented:
    This is an excellent paper, moreover, a much needed paper. Not only does it give a concise introduction into the main issues regarding the science of evolution, it also offers a balanced, non-conflictual perspective on the relation between science and religion. Just one quote: “All science is non-theistic, by which is meant that it does not entail or require any concept of a god or other super- natural being or force. In fact, science is completely inde- pendent of any ideas about gods or other supernatural beliefs. But science is not anti-theistic: it does not deny such beings or forces, any more than it accepts them (or leprechauns or unicorns), because these things are not within the purview of science. ”
    Thanks to @thebandb for posting this on his blog!

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