Who can you convince with scientific evidence? And who not?

This new study aims to predict which people will change their minds about contentious scientific issues when presented with evidence-based information. Quite relevant lately… From the press release: A study in Science Advances presents a framework to accurately predict if a person will change their opinion about a certain topic. The approach estimates the amount of dissonance,… Read More Who can you convince with scientific evidence? And who not?

Probably no surprise here: overconfidence bolsters anti-scientific views

One could describe science as organized scepticism or systematic doubt. So maybe it will not come as a surprise that overconfidence can be linked to anti-scientific views. But because you never can be sure without research and data, a new study examined this claim. From the press release: Historically, the scientific community has relied on… Read More Probably no surprise here: overconfidence bolsters anti-scientific views

Funny on Friday April 1st: this is the best joke I received today and it’s about learning styles!

My friend and co-author Casper Hulshof sent me this one: So pleased to have had my article published toady (and thanks to @Keith_Turvey for the stimulating discussion leading to it). Perhaps we shouldn't be so quick to completely dismiss 'old' theories or myths but instead see what they can still offer. #LearningStyles pic.twitter.com/0LvJWZZYe5 — Sir… Read More Funny on Friday April 1st: this is the best joke I received today and it’s about learning styles!

12 Mitos Urbanos Sobre Aprendizaje Y Educación (2 posters in Spanish)

emos observado que aún hay mucha proliferación en redes como linkedin, y otras, de teorías educativas que no cuentan con evidencia adecuada para ser promovidas en las escuelas. Y esto nos preocupa porque las implicancias de mitos como los estilos de aprendizaje o la pirámide de la experiencia son relevantes. Por ejemplo, decirle a un… Read More 12 Mitos Urbanos Sobre Aprendizaje Y Educación (2 posters in Spanish)

BPS Podcast: Why do people share false information?

I do hope that I’m not sharing false information, but I’m pretty sure I’m not: In this episode 29 of PsychCrunch, the podcast from the British Psychological Society’s Research Digest our presenters Ginny Smith and Jon Sutton explore the psychology of misinformation. They hear about the factors that make people more or less likely to share misinformation,… Read More BPS Podcast: Why do people share false information?

Again: teacher and course evaluations don’t tell you what you think they tell you

We’ve written extensively about this topic in More Myths about Learning and Education, our second myth book, but a new working paper by Vladimir Kogan, Brandon Genetin, Joyce Chen and Alan Kalishagain confirms again: student surveys don’t measure what you think they measure. Grades seem to be the biggest influence in this case – we… Read More Again: teacher and course evaluations don’t tell you what you think they tell you