New study shows the importance – again – of self-control: self-controlled children tend to be healthier middle-aged adults

This is an interesting, although not really surprising study. Self-control or similar concepts related to executive functioning have been proven before to be good predictors. Still, one important question remains: is it trainable… From the press release:  Self-control, the ability to contain one’s own thoughts, feelings and behaviors, and to work toward goals with a… Read More New study shows the importance – again – of self-control: self-controlled children tend to be healthier middle-aged adults

Does SEL lead to more actual learning? New study examines the long-term impact (Best Evidence in Brief)

There is a new Best Evidence in Brief and this time I picked this study from this biweekly newsletter: Social-emotional learning (SEL), such as the ability to set goals and manage frustration, have been positively associated with academic outcomes. These findings have encouraged policymakers to implement programs that help students build up their SEL competencies. However, the… Read More Does SEL lead to more actual learning? New study examines the long-term impact (Best Evidence in Brief)

Making personality changes can sometimes promote success (and still, I feel a bit scared)

This is the kind of study that is interesting but can also lead to new myths in education. In short the press release states that this new study may hold the key to job success as it finds that young people who develop higher levels of conscientiousness and emotional stability during the transition to employment… Read More Making personality changes can sometimes promote success (and still, I feel a bit scared)

A popular but incorrect idea: our brain is not an onion with a tiny reptile inside

It’s something I’ve head over and over again but that is corrected in this preprint by Cesario, Johnsson & Eisthen from which this is the abstract: A widespread misconception in much of psychology holds that (1) as vertebrate animals evolved, “newer” brain structures were added over existing “older” brain structures and (2) these newer, more… Read More A popular but incorrect idea: our brain is not an onion with a tiny reptile inside

Effects of poverty on childhood development seen in children as young as 5

I’ve discussed this topic before, check e.g. here or here, and this new study again shows it: poverty can shape the child. From the press release: In a nationwide study, UCLA researchers have found that health inequities can be measured in children as young as 5 years old. The research, published in Health Affairs, contributes to… Read More Effects of poverty on childhood development seen in children as young as 5

This scientific and at the same time satirical article is just great: Development of an Offline-Friend Addiction Questionnaire (O-FAQ): Are most people really social addicts?

When people do research on social interactions on social media, what are they really trying to examine? And how do they do this? The latter quite often through self-reported measures ending up with claims about addiction to social media to answer the first question. This new satirical article by Satchell et al applies the same… Read More This scientific and at the same time satirical article is just great: Development of an Offline-Friend Addiction Questionnaire (O-FAQ): Are most people really social addicts?

The impact of teacher burnout on student behavior and discipline issues

Education is often interaction, but some kinds of interaction are not necessarily so positive. A new study – with some high No Shit, Sherlock! feel to it – shows that the stress of teachers can have a trickle-down effect on their students, leading to disruptive behavior that results in student suspensions. And I’ll add: probably… Read More The impact of teacher burnout on student behavior and discipline issues