People with depressive symptoms are more likely to believe false statements about COVID-19 vaccines

Some people think we are living in a time of misinformation, although they could be misinformed. Still, this study shows that adults with depressive symptoms were twice as likely to support misinformation about COVID-19 vaccines. Less surprising: people who endorsed false statements were half as likely to be vaccinated against COVID-19. And yes, these are… Read More People with depressive symptoms are more likely to believe false statements about COVID-19 vaccines

What’s the best way to improve a sad mood? The answer may surprise you…

Ok, sorry for the clickbait title, but the answer did surprise me: it may be whatever skill you think you’re best at! When I thought a bit further it became a No shirt, Sherlock-example. From the press release: Think you’re good at mindfulness techniques? Then that may work best for you. Or do you believe… Read More What’s the best way to improve a sad mood? The answer may surprise you…

Why do we forget? New theory proposes ‘forgetting’ is actually a form of learning

Yesterday, my good friend and mentor Paul Kirschner already shared this new article. No, it’s not about Ebbinghaus, but about a new theory about what is happening in our brain. Or is it? Ebbinghaus is mentioned already in the introduction :). From the press release: We create countless memories as we live our lives but… Read More Why do we forget? New theory proposes ‘forgetting’ is actually a form of learning

Does Taekwondo improve children’s self-regulation?

This study adds support that (certain kinds of) sport can improve self-regulation. The results are in line with previous research into executive functions in which doing sports has a positive effect on self-control, estimating the other, etc.). There is one important limitation in this study: the researchers studied the primary school children for 11 weeks… Read More Does Taekwondo improve children’s self-regulation?

Read our paper: Toward an Ecological Science of Teaching (or in other words: when non-significant is significant and vice versa)

Last year I wrote an article together with prof. David Daniel, this article is now published in Canadian Psychology / Psychologie canadienne and you can download our paper here. This is the abstract: The need for a primary emphasis on teaching is a necessary, and as yet unfulfilled, goal of psychological science. We argue that… Read More Read our paper: Toward an Ecological Science of Teaching (or in other words: when non-significant is significant and vice versa)

Four strategies how we deceive ourselves to keep a positive self-image

Maybe we tell the biggest lies to ourselves? Ok, that’s maybe too harsh, but still. Deceiving yourself is normal and can be useful in the short term; but not in the long term. This new study by a team of philosophers examined self-deception and found four strategies we use to keep a positive self-image. From… Read More Four strategies how we deceive ourselves to keep a positive self-image

Interesting NBER working paper: how Covid vaccines help fight anxiety

When people think about the side effects of vaccines, they probably think about fever, pain, being tired,… But a new study looked at other secondary effects of vaccination: what is the effect of vaccination on anxiety and depression, the other pandemic happening because of the coronavirus: In this paper, we use data from a national… Read More Interesting NBER working paper: how Covid vaccines help fight anxiety

Another replication crisis victim? Do Gestures Really Facilitate Speech Production?

This is a replication study by Yagmur Deniz Kısa and colleagues that looks at an insight that has been held for decades: people will speak more fluently when they use gestures. Or more concrete: According to an influential version of this proposal, the Lexical Retrieval Hypothesis (LRH), gestures facilitate speech production by helping speakers find… Read More Another replication crisis victim? Do Gestures Really Facilitate Speech Production?