Interesting study suggests our brain has two systems for thinking about others’ thoughts that develop in a different time frame

A new study shows that 4-year-olds can understand what another person is thinking, and not, as some have assumed, 1-year-olds. The reason is that we seem to have two different systems in our brains through which we can put ourselves into the shoes of someone else. The thing is: these two systems mature at different… Read More Interesting study suggests our brain has two systems for thinking about others’ thoughts that develop in a different time frame

Similarities in structure and essence guide our memory more than surface similarities

All research on memory is fascinating and often relevant to education. In this new study, researchers found that similarities in structure and essence guide our recollections rather than surface similarities. It is only when individuals lack sufficient knowledge that they turn to the surface clues to recollect a situation. So maybe, this study suggests we… Read More Similarities in structure and essence guide our memory more than surface similarities

Another study, another blow to mind-set theory?

Brooke Macnamara just shared a new paper he published together with Burgoyne and Hambrick in which they checked 6 claims about the (growth) mind-set theory. Handy for me, his tweets are a perfect summary: We examined 6 key claims of mindset theory. The strongest association (r=−.12) was in the opposite direction from the theory's claim.… Read More Another study, another blow to mind-set theory?

On helicopter parenting: most often middle- to upper-class & leads to ‘low mastery, self-regulation and social competence.’

Ah, the helicopter parents, meaning it so well, but… maybe not the best option? New research seems to suggest this (again). I do have to note that while I think this study is interesting, I do see some weak points as the study is more about the perception of the parenting by the children; is… Read More On helicopter parenting: most often middle- to upper-class & leads to ‘low mastery, self-regulation and social competence.’

Two very similar theories but from two different backgrounds: CLT and the Scarcity Mindset

John Sweller’s Cognitive Load Theory has been quite successful for the past few years, with e.g. Dylan Wiliam calling it the most important theory in present day education. The essence is that our short term memory is limited in the number of elements it can contain simultaneously. I do prefer the distinction Sweller originally made… Read More Two very similar theories but from two different backgrounds: CLT and the Scarcity Mindset

A new 8-year long longitudinal study on time spent on social media shows a non-impact on mental health

I’m sure this still will come as a big surprise to many, but it’s pretty difficult for results to be as clear:   Time spent using social media was not related to individual changes in depression or anxiety over 8 years. This lack of a relationship was found even in the transition between adolescence and… Read More A new 8-year long longitudinal study on time spent on social media shows a non-impact on mental health

A new study on the Flynn Effect in the US shows something quite different

We have discussed the Flynn Effect – the rise of IQ over decades – over and over again on this blog. We’ve also seen that there is possibly a reverse Flynn Effect in several countries lately. A new study makes this even more complicated:   When outdated norms are used, the Flynn Effect inflates IQs… Read More A new study on the Flynn Effect in the US shows something quite different

The difference between learning and thinking you have learned

Several colleagues shared this study past weekend, and I can understand why: Despite active learning being recognized as a superior method of instruction in the classroom, a major recent survey found that most college STEM instructors still choose traditional teaching methods. This article addresses the long-standing question of why students and faculty remain resistant to… Read More The difference between learning and thinking you have learned