Interesting results of study: male workers in typically female jobs are not motivated by money

The study isn’t published in a journal yet but was presetend at the British Psychological Society’s Division of Occupational Psychology annual conference in East Midlands Conference Centre, Nottingham but interesting enough to share even if it isn’t published in a peer reviewed journal yet. The conclusion: Men in typically female-dominated occupations tend to value the social aspects of their career over financial rewards.

It’s a qualitative study, so don’t be put off by the small amount of persons who where interviewed:

A total of 34 men were interviewed; this included 15 primary school teachers and 19 university administrators. They discussed their career history, experience of success and the support they received from their organisations. The interviews revealed that their definitions of career success included features other than pay and promotion such as building friendships with colleagues and flexible working that enabled time for family and social commitments.

Further from the press release:

For male primary school teachers career development was reflected in the varied challenges brought by pupils. They also valued recognition of success from their colleagues, but some felt pressured to apply for opportunities for career progression, which was contrasting to their actual career goals.

Dr Solowiej said: “It is often assumed that men value careers with regular opportunities for promotion; however our study demonstrates that this isn’t always the case. Men who work in typically female-dominated occupations value success in ways that went beyond salary and promotion.

“Organisations need to understand that some of their male employees may not be motivated purely by promotional opportunities. Therefore it is important that gender stereotypical assumptions about success are challenged so we can understand what is important to individuals within different occupational contexts.”

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