Study confirms: Bookworms benefit

I found that I overlooked a Best Evidence in Brief from January in my Inbox, and this study is too interesting to keep a secret:
New research published in the British Educational Research Journal has found that reading for pleasure is more strongly linked to cognitive progress in adolescence than parents’ education.
Data on 3,583 16-year-olds was taken from the 1970 British Cohort Study. This study follows the lives of people born in England, Scotland, and Wales in a single week of 1970, collecting information on health, physical, educational, and social development, and economic circumstances among other factors.

The authors set out to explore the relative importance of economic and cultural resources in determining class differentials in educational outcomes. They found that the home reading culture (including reading to the child and parents reading books and newspapers) was linked to children’s test scores, and this had a role in mediating the influence of parents’ education and also to some extent in mediating parents’ social class.

Childhood reading was linked to substantial cognitive progress between the ages of 10 and 16. Reading was most strongly linked to progress in vocabulary, with a weaker, but still substantial link to progress in mathematics.

The research also found that parental education was much more strongly linked than parental social class to both vocabulary and mathematics scores, broadly supporting the idea that cultural resources matter more to cognitive outcomes than economic resources.
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2 Comments

Filed under At home, Education, Research

2 responses to “Study confirms: Bookworms benefit

  1. Reblogged this on Richard The Teacher and commented:
    It’s official: Reading is good for you! #authoru #amwriting #bookwork #amreading

  2. Pingback: #BornToLearn: verslag van TEDxAmsterdamED 2016

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