Does successfully improving students’ achievement test scores lead to higher rates of national economic growth?

No, this isn’t a OECD or PISA-bashing post, but I found a new study by Komatsua and Rappleye via @cbokhove that raises an important question: does successfully improving students’ achievement test scores lead to higher rates of national economic growth. This is a claim based on research by Hanushek and Woessmann and is the basis for a lot of policy-influencing research and policy-advice by e.g. PISA or the World bank. But Komatsua and Rappleye argue now that this claim is maybe based on flawed statistics, as the abstract makes clear what it’s all about:

Several recent, highly influential comparative studies have made strong statistical claims that improvements on global learning assessments such as PISA will lead to higher GDP growth rates. These claims have provided the primary source of legitimation for policy reforms championed by leading international organisations, most notably the World Bank and OECD. To date there have been several critiques but these have been too limited to challenge the validity of the claims. The consequence is continued utilisation and citation of these strong claims, resulting in a growing aura of scientific truth and concrete policy reforms. In this piece we report findings from two original studies that invalidate these statistical claims. Our intent is to contribute to a more rigorous global discussion on education policy, as well as call attention to the fact that the new global policy regime is founded on flawed statistics.

They performed a replication on the same data Hanushek and Woessmann used and their conclusion sounds a bit damning:

Our primary purpose has been to report findings from two studies where our results invalidate H&W’s strong statistical claims that attempt to link student test scores and economic growth. In Study 1, we observed that the explanatory power of test scores was weak in subsequent periods: the relationship between scores and growth has been neither consistently strong nor strongly consistent. In Study 2, we observed that the relationship between changes in test scores in one period and changes in economic growth for subsequent periods were unclear at best, doubtful at worst. Combined, these two original studies do not simply challenge the key statistical claims advanced by H&W but invalidate them because they utilise the same sample, dataset and methods.

But I have to agree with Christian Bokhove in our tweet conversation about this article that both scientists are quite a bit firm in their statements. Still: I think it’s too important not to have further debate on this topic as it’s quite essential to present policy.

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One response to “Does successfully improving students’ achievement test scores lead to higher rates of national economic growth?

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