New report finds several popular study strategies are ineffective; effective study strategies are underused

I wrote already a blogpost in Dutch about it, but I also want to share this new report here.

From the press release:

“Students everywhere, put down those highlighters and pick up some flashcards! Some of the most popular study strategies — such as highlighting and even rereading — don’t show much promise for improving student learning, according to a new report published in Psychological Science in the Public Interest, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

In the report, John Dunlosky of Kent State University and a team of distinguished psychological scientists review the scientific evidence for ten learning techniques commonly used by students.

“Schools and parents spend a great deal of money on technology and programs to improve student achievement, even though evidence often isn’t available to firmly establish that they work,” says Dunlosky. “We wanted to take a comprehensive look at promising strategies now, in order to direct teachers, students and parents to the strategies that are effective, yet underused.”

Based on the available evidence, the researchers provide recommendations about the applicability and usefulness of each technique.

While the ten learning techniques vary widely in effectiveness, two strategies — practice testing and distributed practice — made the grade, receiving the highest overall utility rating.”

You can read the further press-release here.

Annie Murphy Paul made a fine summary of the report here for Time Magazine.

You can download the report here.

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1 Comment

Filed under Education, Myths, Research

One response to “New report finds several popular study strategies are ineffective; effective study strategies are underused

  1. Pingback: Learning by repetition impairs recall of details (study) | From experience to meaning...

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