What’s next for children & media research?

There is a new EU Kids report and in this report Sonia Livingstone, Giovanna Mascheroni and Elisabeth Staksrud discuss how the original EU Kids Online analytical model was constructed. They review key findings produced from qualitative and quantitative research by EU Kids Online before discussing the rationale for a revised model that reflects the findings better and raises new questions for research.

More important they than conclude that future research should examine the following 12 research priorities:

  1. Factors relating to children’s identity and resources, beyond demographic variables.
  2. New modes of access to the internet, as this becomes more mobile, personalised, pervasive.
  3. A multidimensional analysis of digital skills and literacies and their significance for well-being.
  4. A rethinking of the ‘ladder of opportunities’ to identify whether and when children undertake more ambitious creative or civic online activities.
  5. New kinds of online risks including risks to their personal data, privacy issues and online reputation management.
  6. The interplay between children’s digital practices and proprietary policies and mechanisms.
  7. Children’s desire to experiment and transgress boundaries, to grasp children’s agency online.
  8. Extending the analysis of how parents mediate their children’s internet use to the potential importance of other socialising agents.
  9. Extending research on 9-to 16-year olds to much younger children’s use of digital media.
  10. Research on sociotechnological innovations in smart/wearable/ubiquitous everyday devices.
  11. The implications of digital engagement as it may reconfigure (undermine or enhance, alter or diversify) children’s wellbeing in the long term.
  12. Relate the research agenda on children’s online access, risks and opportunities to the broader agenda of children’s rights – to provision, participation and protection – in the digital age.

You can download the file here.

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Filed under Media literacy, Research, Review, Social Media, Technology

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